Advice for 7th Graders

Dear 6th graders, some advice from the people that died during 7th grade. Don’t do anything that we did. Instead of apathy, try at life; we don’t believe in you. Read bitter melon, for it is the greatest book you will ever read, see, and hear.  It is a metaphor for how to hold chopsticks. Do your HW, don’t do drugs. I’m too dead inside to write this. I don’t care about life anymore.

Do ya HW

  • It doesn’t matter if your teacher doesn’t take it up, you should at least try to do it. Then again it depends on the class.

Pay attention during class

  • Just do this if you don’t wanna do your homework but still want pretty good grades.

Everything is subjective, it just depends on what classes you take and what type of person you are.

Even more haikus

night time
Darkness envelopes
The skies turning oh so black,
When will my stars come?

my feelings on April
The Month April sucks
Always switching temperatures,
Make up your darn mind

rain
Dripping down to earth
Thunder and lighting join in,
Rain at its finest

Haikus

Stars

Glistening stars
Twinkling in the night sky,
Return tomorrow

my dumb dog

Oh, oh, here she comes
My stupid dog with a ball,
I’m gonna throw it

a figure

My heart beat quickens
My azure eyes fill with fear,
just what is that thing?

Poem

20160407-134022.jpg

Fix my boy, 2014 by Ana Hinojosa

When I Spoke by Alex-Quam Pham

“When I spoke the words I am gay
I had let them fester like blood on a prison cell wall.
I hadn’t known that they would free themselves.

They scaled the swollen gutter of my throat, and shot
themselves right through Uncle Andy’s
diaphragm, holding the air in lungs hostage so he
had no words left of his own. He could only unfurl his
vinegar lips to sputter silent thank yous across my brow.

I kissed the darkness three times, because it stole
those three merciless words from me
before my Mother could.

She told me that I would never
survive a New York winter:

Mother, painted face and gossamer cheeks. It wasn’t you
walking down the hall to Economics, when you heard
a familiar voice, a voice that told jokes you always
laughed at in class, and he said: I can
tolerate faggots,
but if they flirt with me, I wouldn’t
hesitate
to beat them down.

I swore that was the best joke I’d ever heard, because
my stomach laughed itself into hollow
tree trunk,
and then nothingness.

Mother,
painted face and gossamer cheeks,
you wouldn’t know that I
hated him more than he
hated me.

2

Let me tell you what makes me measure
my existence by the pauses, when the silence
between each stammering heartbeat screams
like a head snapping forward.

The taste of gangrene is much
too sweet, so it’s better to slide my fingers across
my swollen gutter throat,
aching for that ticking pulse to just
stand
still,

when each throb of the heart will dance
to the cadence of euthanasia.

But the rabid pounding
against my ribcage,
fists upon flesh, bare-chested,
is the wielding of hammer and chisel.
He is a blacksmith,

And it is he who wrought my personhood.

3

I can’t tell you who I am.

But I can tell you that as I sat in that
lavender bedroom, when
my Mother spit that quivering prayer,
fix my boy,
fix my boy,
I knew then, the worst combinations of words
always came in threes. But I,
made of only jagged elbows,
clicking jawbone
and slivers of teenage torso,

I pieced each slab of soiled
skin back together, and
I hissed at her,
I am consummate and I am beauty
and you cannot fix what is
not broken.

And I can tell you that once, a woman
christened me Angel
and told me what my Mother couldn’t,
that the venom in my veins
was only stardust.
She had all of her Angels turn their eyes up
to that slice of heaven and we screamed
yes yes yes
until we became phoenixes, rising from the ashes
of our yesterdays.

And I can tell you that my little brother
has the voice of weathered sidewalks, rich
with the cracks of prepuberty and smooth
like innocence unsullied. And his
I believe in you could sing
every spilled breath to sleep.

I can tell you that my Mother
could very well be right when she told me I
would never survive
a New York winter,

because I am only jagged elbows,
clicking jawbone,
and slivers of teenage torso.
But there is one thing
I know for certain:

that boy,
who let those three merciless words
scale his swollen gutter of a throat,

he
is a blacksmith,
and he

has taught
me

everything.”

The main reason why I chose this poem is because I feel like it does show the pain that some people go through when they come out, and although this writing does refer to coming out as gay I think that pretty much anyone that has been in a similar situation whether pan-sexual, bi-sexual or trans can relate to the general feel that the poem gives off.

POEM SOURCE:
Poetry foundation

3 Amazing Tourist Attractions in the United States

Sequoia National Park

Sequoia National ParkCreative Commons License Vladimir Kudinov via Compfight

With it’s towering trees, diverse group of animals and bumpy terrain, the Sequoia National Park is bound to catch any nature lover’s eye.
Hiking, bird watching and just walking around are some of the many things you can do at the beautiful park, it’s guaranteed to be fun.

Missouri Botanical Garden

20160401-100201.jpg

Do you love flowers, succulents, and other plants? But don’t have a desire to actually go outside and search for this things? If you said yes to one or both of these questions, the Missouri Botanical Garden is perfect for you then! With thousands upon thousands of flowers plants, it will be sure to enchant even the most cynical of people.

Houston space center

20160401-100829.jpg

Love space and rockets, the Houston Space Center has you covered. With it’s shuttles and endless knowledge about space travel , visiting here is a must if you’re in the area.

Tonkawa facts part 2

Type of tribe

The Tonkawa were nomadic hunters, depending more on hunting bison than crops.

Why?
Wolves, the animal that had apparently led them into this world, were believed to have instructed the Tonkawa tribe to not cultivate crops or stay in specific area of extended amounts of time, living a live more similar to that of a wolf’s.

What happened to them

In 1859, the Tonkawa abandoned their homeland a settled the Brazos reservation, a reservation constructed for several Native American tribes including the Tonkawa in the 1850’s, then after 3 years a collection of seven tribes (including the Comanche, Delaware, Shawnee, Caddo, Wichita, and other tribes) attackted, killing approximately 300, before escaping south towards the Washita reservation in Oklahoma. They stayed in the Washita reservation until 1884, before being relocated to Fort Griffin. They then briefly stayed at the Sac and Fox Agency before finally moving to their current home, Oakland, in 1885.

SOURCES:
“The Tonkawa Story.” The Tonkawa Story. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“The Tonkawa Tribe.” The Tonkawa Tribe. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015
“The Tonkawan Indians of Texas.” The Tonkawan Indians of Texas. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“The Tonkawa Indians – City of Round Rock.” City of Round Rock. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“TONKAWA INDIANS.” CARLISLE, JEFFREY D. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“Tonkawa Indian Fact Sheet.” Facts for Kids: Tonkawa Indians (Tonkawas). N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“The Tonkawa Tribe Official Website!” The Tonkawa Tribe Official Website! N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“Tonkawa Indians, Texas Indians.” Tonkawa Indians, Texas Indians. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“Nomad.” – New World Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015

Tonkawa Facts (part 1)

A few months back we were learning about Texan Native American tribes in my history class and I thought the Tonkawa tribe was the most interesting out of the ones we studied, so I just wanted to share a few facts about them.

ORGINS AND MAIN LOCATIONS

Although originally said to have originated in central to southeast Texas, evidence shows that Tonkawa bands may have migrated south from the high plains in the late 1600’s
The Tonkawa’s mainly lived in central Texas (around the same area as modern day Austin) before being forced south into upwards Oklahoma due to complications with reservations and other issues.

ROLES OF TRIBE MEMBERS AND TRIBE STRUCTURES

The men were often the hunters/chiefs and warriors, with women handling chores,children, and other household activities.

All that is really known about the political structure of the Tonkawa tribe is that each band elected a chief to lead them, and that they may have chosen another leader during wars.
Tonkawa was a maternal society, where kinship is traced on the mothers side of the family, with men joining the wife’s tribe/band when wed. (Also because members in each band were considered family even if not blood related, marriage within bands was discouraged even to the point of being branded as a act of incest.)

SOURCES:
“The Tonkawa Story.” The Tonkawa Story. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“The Tonkawa Tribe.” The Tonkawa Tribe. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015
“The Tonkawan Indians of Texas.” The Tonkawan Indians of Texas. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“The Tonkawa Indians – City of Round Rock.” City of Round Rock. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“TONKAWA INDIANS.” CARLISLE, JEFFREY D. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“Tonkawa Indian Fact Sheet.” Facts for Kids: Tonkawa Indians (Tonkawas). N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“The Tonkawa Tribe Official Website!” The Tonkawa Tribe Official Website! N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“Tonkawa Indians, Texas Indians.” Tonkawa Indians, Texas Indians. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
“Nomad.” – New World Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Oct. 2015

Facts about the Brazilian wandering spider

1. This specific species of spider are known to be highly aggressive, especially if you invade their territory.
2. Their venom is extremely lethal, in fact the Quinness book of world records acknowledged the Brazilian wandering spider as having the most toxic venom in the world.
3. These arachnids have been known to travel with imported goods, especially bananas, hence their other name the banana spider.
4. Brazilian wandering spiders live pretty long lives according to critter standards, sometimes living for almost 2 years.
5. When threatened, they put their two front legs up into the air and shake their “hips”.

That’s all I remember! I think I did mildly well for someone who basically pulled all of these facts from the back of my mind. Also I realized I can’t write commentary for anything.

Solemn drips

Silence. Pure silence, no whispers or laughs or yells, no screams or cries, just lonely silence; broken only by solemn drips of water and the soft click of my heels on mossy concrete as I descended deeper down the steep, spiraling staircase.
Rats scurried with each step I took, letting out quiet squeaks as they bolted away into dark crevices. I could almost feel eight delicate appendages crawling their way up my back as spider from above and below gazed at me, wonder or loathing filling their obsidian, marble like eyes.
It felt like a eternity had passed when I finally arrived at the the final slippery step, by now only the faintest bit light from openings above kept me aware of my surroundings; I could barely make out an…island? It seemed like a tiny body of bricks just slightly risen from a pond of pitch black water.
My entire being was telling me to turn around and run, to leave this cavern immediately, but there was just something so very…mesmerizing about

That’s all I have written so far.

Ps, Sorry Mrs.Kriese I’m still editing the commentary about the essay, I’m planning on posting it next week.

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

1 2
Skip to toolbar